qthewetsprocket

This evening I had a very pleasant time with Holly, which began with her mentioning how much she liked the song “Across the Universe” and me playing her the version of the song by Laibach, which has always been my favourite. “Dad,” she said, happily, “This was the version of the song I knew as a little girl. You used to play it. I always wondered why the Beatles one sounded different from the way I expected. I mean you could understand the words for a start.” Then we sat in front of the computer for a few hours and I made her a playlist of more songs she had loved as a small girl, the ones she’d remembered and the ones she’d forgotten, which led to our having The Conversation. You know, the one I’ve known was coming for the last almost-nineteen years.

I dragged songs from her childhood over to the playlist — “Barcelona” and “Nothing Compares 2 U” and “I Don’t Like Mondays” and “These Foolish Things” and then came Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side”. “You named me from this song, didn’t you?” said Holly as the first bass notes sang. “Yup,” I said.

Lou started singing.

Holly listened to the first verse, and for the first time, actually heard the words.

"Shaved her legs and then he was a she…? He?"

"That’s right," I said, and bit the bullet. We were having The Conversation. "You were named after a drag queen in a Lou Reed song."

She grinned like a light going on. “Oh dad. I do love you,” she said. Then she picked up an envelope and wrote what I’d just said down on the back, in case she forgot it.

I’m not sure that I’d ever expected The Conversation to go quite like that.

neil-gaiman:

weareteachers:

“Well-meaning adults can easily destroy a child’s love of reading: stop them reading what they enjoy, or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like, the 21st-century equivalents of Victorian “improving” literature. You’ll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and worse, unpleasant.”
— 
Neil Gaiman, “Why our future depends on libraries, reading, and daydreaming”


This is wonderful.

neil-gaiman:

weareteachers:

Well-meaning adults can easily destroy a child’s love of reading: stop them reading what they enjoy, or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like, the 21st-century equivalents of Victorian “improving” literature. You’ll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and worse, unpleasant.
— 

Neil Gaiman, “Why our future depends on libraries, reading, and daydreaming”

This is wonderful.

neil-gaiman:

The parent who wants NEVERWHERE banned, wants it banned for this scene, and this scene alone. A scene too R-Rated for the parent to even describe on TV.
I’m posting it for anyone who is thinking that Neverwhere must be PRETTY HOT STUFF. This is your half-page of raunch.
For those of you going “whoa, I bet it gets even hotter after this…” it doesn’t. That was it. Some drunken adulterous jumper-fumbling and three fucks by two people on a bench we will never meet again. And then on with Richard’s story…

neil-gaiman:

The parent who wants NEVERWHERE banned, wants it banned for this scene, and this scene alone. A scene too R-Rated for the parent to even describe on TV.

I’m posting it for anyone who is thinking that Neverwhere must be PRETTY HOT STUFF. This is your half-page of raunch.

For those of you going “whoa, I bet it gets even hotter after this…” it doesn’t. That was it. Some drunken adulterous jumper-fumbling and three fucks by two people on a bench we will never meet again. And then on with Richard’s story…

Dear Mr. Gaiman. Do you ever accidentally stop writing mid-sentence to come back later and completely forget where you were going? If yes, what do you do?

neil-gaiman:

Yes.

Write something else.

neil-gaiman:

abandonedography:

Patrycja Makowska

In my head, an exploding TARDIS would look like this…

D:

neil-gaiman:

abandonedography:

Patrycja Makowska

In my head, an exploding TARDIS would look like this…

D:

Are you a leader or a follower? (Personally, I aspire to be the kid who points out that the emperor has no clothes on, but what about you?)

neil-gaiman:

I’m an author. We don’t want to lead. We don’t need to follow. We stay home and make stuff up and write it down and send it out into the world, and get inside people’s heads. Perhaps we change the world and perhaps we don’t. We never know. We just make stuff up.

n3rdgeschoss:

This is something i made after reading the book. And here is a quote that describes exactly what I felt while reading it:
I will say this. It made me smile. I laughed out loud. I cried. Not because of any particular sad moment, but because sometimes the shape a story makes is like a key turning inside me and I cannot do anything but weep.
- Patrick Rothfuss

n3rdgeschoss:

This is something i made after reading the book. And here is a quote that describes exactly what I felt while reading it:

I will say this. It made me smile. I laughed out loud. I cried. Not because of any particular sad moment, but because sometimes the shape a story makes is like a key turning inside me and I cannot do anything but weep.

- Patrick Rothfuss

neil-gaiman:

whooooooooooo

neil-gaiman:

whooooooooooo

neil-gaiman:

In which Joe Hill is traumatised by the fold out in the very shiny UK edition of FORTUNATELY THE MILK
View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay

neil-gaiman:

In which Joe Hill is traumatised by the fold out in the very shiny UK edition of FORTUNATELY THE MILK

View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay